one to one logo

social facebook box blue 32social twitter box blue 32social rss box orange 32social google box 32

Featured On K 12 Bluprint badge
header picture 1
Up

Research Library

This review was designed to further our understanding of the link between teachers’ pedagogical beliefs and their educational uses of technology. The synthesis of qualitative findings integrates the available evidence about this relationship with the ultimate goal being to facilitate the integration of technology in education.

This study enhances the value of ubiquitous technology in a systemic transformation of teaching and learning.

Since the first implementation in 1989, one-to-one computing programs have dramatically grown and, today, the need for personal, portable technology in the classroom is more relevant than ever. However, in order to effectively implement such programs in their own classrooms, educators need guidance and best practices. In collaboration with Intel Corporation, the One-to-One Institute developed the first National One-to-One Computing Program Database.

This project-based learning resource, created as part of a partnership between the Pearson Foundation and the National Academy Foundation, focuses on digital storytelling as a tool and instructional best practice for Academies. The information included in this primer is designed to supplement three exciting, project-based digital arts opportunities available to schools in the NAF network:

*Capturing a Career – a project where students create brief “video resumes” that highlight their interests, skills, experiences, and career aspirations.

*Digital Storytelling – a project where students from any Academy or course develop and communicate insights about a topic through short video documentaries.

*Professional Development Technology Workshops – a “teacher as student” professional development opportunity where participants build teamwork and technology skills as they create a useful video products to support their own programs.

These technology projects provide accessible models of project-based learning and serve as powerful opportunities to advance broader school reform goals through engaging project work.

The New Media Consortium (NMC) and CoSN (the Consortium for School Networking) jointly released the NMC Horizon Report > 2015 K-12 Edition in a special session at the annual ISTE Conference. This edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in K-12 education.

Six key trends, six significant challenges, and six important developments in educational technology are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, giving school leaders, educational technologists, and teachers a valuable guide for strategic technology planning. The format of the report provides in-depth insight into how trends and challenges are accelerating and impeding the adoption of educational technology, along with their implications for policy, leadership, and practice.

Mobile learning traditionally means any learning that is mediated by a mobile device such as a smartphone, tablet, or mini computer. In the bigger picture, mobile learners access their content, tools, and communities any time, any place, often in a mixed environment of multiple devices with 24/7/365 Internet access.

Mobile learning traditionally means any learning that is mediated by a mobile device such as a smartphone, tablet, or mini computer. In the bigger picture, mobile learners access their content, tools, and communities any time, any place, often in a mixed environment of multiple devices with 24/7/365 Internet access.

Online learning can expand student options, provide new distribution models for staffing for hard-to-fill subjects, and power blended learning. It shares many critical success factors with traditional education, such as relying on excellent educators providing instruction and agency, but there are other differences that require a solid plan and well-developed strategy.

Grant Wiggins’ creativity rubric for lessons.

There is much talk about the difference between 20th and 21st Century education. The differences between the students of the 20th Century and those we teach now are profound, well known and documented. From these differences, plus the differences that exist in the world we live in now and the world our students will occupy, it is safe to assume that education to must change. So this is an attempt to compare the predominant educational approach of the 20th Century and that of the 21st Century.

Compiled by Kimberly Tyson, Ph.D. twitter:@tysonkimberly
Learning Unlimited

Mobile devices, used under the guidance of highly qualified teachers, offer powerful ways to engage K-12 students, spark their curiosity, and improve achievement. But budgets are tighter than ever. How can cash-strapped school systems give all students access to vital educational technologies?

The Critical Skills model of instruction builds powerful lessons in classrooms ranging from pre-K to post-graduate. The model combines experiential learning, problem based learning, and rigorous high standards within an intentionally created collaborative learning community, creating the classrooms that many educators imagine, but can’t quite put together. It is the “how” in answer to the “what” of powerful classroom practice. And it was created, continues to be created, by practicing classroom teachers.

An effective secondary school design incorporates 10 integrated principles to meet the demands of the Common Core.

These were developed through a scan of design principles used by New York City Department of Education, New Visions for Public Schools, and other high-performing school networks, and refined with the feedback and contributions of experienced educators.

 
 

One-to-One Institute is an international non-profit committed to igniting
21st century education through the implementation of one-to-one technology
in K-12 education environments.

Copyright © 2020 The One-to-One Institute. All Rights Reserved.
site development and hosting by interGen web solutions