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This review was designed to further our understanding of the link between teachers’ pedagogical beliefs and their educational uses of technology. The synthesis of qualitative findings integrates the available evidence about this relationship with the ultimate goal being to facilitate the integration of technology in education.

Henrico County Public Schools Final Report.  Insights from a Pioneering Leader of One-to-One Mobile Computing

An effective secondary school design incorporates 10 integrated principles to meet the demands of the Common Core.

These were developed through a scan of design principles used by New York City Department of Education, New Visions for Public Schools, and other high-performing school networks, and refined with the feedback and contributions of experienced educators.

The Critical Skills model of instruction builds powerful lessons in classrooms ranging from pre-K to post-graduate. The model combines experiential learning, problem based learning, and rigorous high standards within an intentionally created collaborative learning community, creating the classrooms that many educators imagine, but can’t quite put together. It is the “how” in answer to the “what” of powerful classroom practice. And it was created, continues to be created, by practicing classroom teachers.

A recent set of case studies from FSG concluded, “Blended learning has arrived in K-12 education. Over the past few years, technology has grown to influence nearly every aspect of the U.S. education system,” By the end of the decade, most U.S. schools will fully incorporate instructional technology into their structures and schedules. They will use predominantly digital instructional materials. The learning day and year will be extended. Learning will be more personalized, and the reach of effective teachers will be expanded.

The first question for curriculum writers is not: “What will we teach and when should we teach it?” Rather the initial question for curriculum development must be goal focused: “Having learned key content, what will students be able to do with it?”

Compiled by Kimberly Tyson, Ph.D. twitter:@tysonkimberly
Learning Unlimited

Grant Wiggins’ creativity rubric for lessons.

This report summarizes the results of a yearlong effort to integrate laptop computers among all the students and teachers in grade three of the Eastern Townships School Board.

Under its Common Core Technology Project (CCTP), the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) plans to deliver technology devices to every teacher and student in the district. The effort began in August 2013, with the delivery of devices to the first wave of schools, and will continue through three stages that unfold over five years. The external evaluation of the project, conducted by American Institutes for Research (AIR), will address the implementation and outcomes of the program. This Interim Report is intended to provide formative feedback toward program improvement based on the evaluation of the program’s first year of implementation.

This introduction provides a description of CCTP and an overview of the evaluation approach that was employed in the first year.

Schools all over the country are developing technology plans to implement “ubiquitous computing” in some form. By “ubiquitous computing,” people usually mean a combination of two key ingredients: wireless networking which provides high-speed Internet access, and a 1-to-1 computer-to-student ratio, achieved in most cases by the acquisition of laptops. The educational press has reported on many experiments such as the Maine Laptop Initiative, and similar programs at the local and state level. The new XO, “$100” computer provides an added dimension of affordability and innovation, along with the attractive vision of universal access to computer power and the many gifts of the World-Wide Web.